Where there is no hope, there must be determination PART 3

by DENNIS ADAIR
(COLUMBIA)

Where there is no hope, there must be determination PART 3

March 23

As I look back on my life, it was good and yes there is a happy ending but I am not there yet. In the 60's they came out with 1 sugar free soda, called NO CAL, in ginger ale and coke. They were expensive and you could only get the soda at the super market. No sugar free anything, no gum, candy, chocolate, pies etc. There was one sugar substitute and it was called saccharin in little pills. They were fine in hot food, but not in cereal.

So you would boil some water and melt them and then pour it over the cereal. There was no low fat food, in fact I believe there were no health label on the food until much latter. Living in the suburbs of Philadelphia, in the small community of Villenova, their were some good ethnic foods. Hot dogs, Italian subs, grinders and the world famous cheese steak sub.

In 1967 at the age of 14, I went into the hospital again for two weeks of test and stabilization, which never worked, (I'll get back to that in a minute), so the dietitian comes in, the same one now for about five years and wants to know what my favorite food is. Now remember I am 14 living outside of Philly, so I told her the truth.

She could not handle the truth, and she turned and left the room yelling down the hall right for the doctor. The doctor came in a short time later and smiling at me asked what did I do to that poor women. I told him, the truth. Even today as I am sitting in the waiting room at The Joslin Diabetic Center in Baltimore, I hear people saying that they will not tell

there doctor the truth about how much food they eat and what kind of food it is and how much exercise they do a week.

We need to be frank and honest with ourselves and with our doctors. Well now it was the doctors turn to hear the truth about these two week hospital stays. Being in the hospital, laying flat on my back for two weeks might have gotten me stable, with food and insulin, but it lacked the main ingredient, activity.

I insisted that I be allowed out to run or to work out. That of course was not allowed, but the doctor and I put our heads together and came up with going to physical therapy twice a day for an hour.

I should have never told him that because now every year it would take three weeks instead of the normal two weeks. My blood sugars were all over the place. The day I was leaving the hospital, I walked out the door into the parking lot and went into a convulsion. That year, the first year with the exercise, I was in for four weeks.

Of course each year, it was right after school let out for the summer, and then right into the diabetic camp for two weeks, so I did not see my mom at all during hospital stays and of course not at camp. It was her vacation away from me.

It was this time in the hospital, when I was fourteen, my doctor told my mom that he did not think I would live past the age of thirty five. It was then that I determine I would prove him wrong. I believe that it has been this drive and determination that has help me live pass what both the doctors and the American Diabetic Association life expectancy. Go to part 4

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